National Bighorn Sheep Center

CAMP BIGHORN A SUCCESS!

The first-overnight Camp Bighorn held at the Whiskey Mountain Conservation Camp near Dubois, WY was a great success! We hosted 25 amazing youth ages 9-12 years old from as far away as Alaska and as near as Dubois to participate in this fun, educational full-immersion camp designed to inspire and educate youth about bighorn sheep and their habitat. From a trek to the top of Torrey Rim (everyone made it!), to riparian macroinvertebrates alongside Torrey Creek to an exploration of forest ecology and habitat management, youth participates dove in deep to explore this amazing place and home to the Whiskey Mountain herd of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep.

Camp Bighorn 2019! that captures some of the moments at Camp Bighorn created by our partner and the Education Coordinator of the Wild Sheep Foundation, Ryan Brock.

This amazing Camp Bighorn could not have been accomplished without the help of an amazing group of volunteers, partners and sponsors listed below! Our sincere gratitude to this stellar group of people who helped make Camp Bighorn a success:

Our sincere apologies for anyone we mistakenly did not mention here. Thank you to ALL of our Camp Bighorn Partners, Volunteers and Sponsors for making Camp a success!

Roz Abel
Alaska Wild Sheep Foundation
Greg Anderson
Boys and Girls Club of Dubois
Joe Brandl
Jon and Jess Bressler
Ryan Brock
Michele Burdick
Sarah Butler
Ryan DeBonis
Dinah DiMeolo
Callie Domek
Sara Domek
Eric Matthew Eckard
Lora Engleman
Andrew Evens
Monie Finley

Linda Fowler
Carolyn Gillette
Madison Harper
Kate Debow Hayes
Laney Hicks
Anna Hinkle
Tessa Hust
Cindy Jackelen
Steve Kilpatrick
Kiwanis Club of Dubois
Tom Lucas
Karen McCullough
Mike McCullough
Connie Mock
Cheryl O’Brien

Bill O’Brien
Patricia Poletti
Sarah Quigley
John Rego
Danica Born Ropp
Bernie Rose
Cathy Rosenthal
Julia Royall
Becky Schwanke
Jess Shuler
Bill Sincavage
Lori Sincavage
Rachel Smiley
Lynn Stewart

Karen Sullivan
Elizabeth Taylor
Meredith Taylor
Bruce Thompson
Kathy Treanor
Trudy Trevarthen
U.S. Forest Service: Shoshone National Forest, Wind River District
Utah Wild Sheep Foundation
Brittany Wagler
Washington Wild Sheep Foundation
Wild Sheep Foundation
Larry Wilke
Connie Wood
Wyoming Game and Fish Department & Commission
Wyoming Wild Sheep Foundation

Whiskey Basin Collaborative Project

WHISKEY MOUNTAIN BIGHORN SHEEP
UNDERSTANDING AND SOLUTIONS THROUGH COLLABORATION

WHAT’S GOING ON?
The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in partnership with the Wyoming Wild Sheep Foundation, the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center and the University of Wyoming’s Ruckelshaus Institute is engaging in a public involvement process to explore management concerns, issues, and opportunities for the Whiskey Mountain Bighorn Sheep herd. The Whiskey Mountain bighorn sheep herd was once one of the largest and most nationally recognized herds in the nation and it has been declining since an all age die-off in the early 1990’s. The herd continues to stay below the desired population size primarily because lamb survival is very low. At one time there were an estimated 2,500 sheep in this population; today there are about 750. WGFD needs your insight and ideas how to best manage this herd.

WHAT IS THIS?
This is an opportunity for ALL who are interested or concerned about these bighorn sheep. This process will provide an environment to share information and ideas to better understand the issues, challenges, and opportunities we face to, at minimum, arrest population decline in the Whiskey Mountain herd.

WHY DO THIS?
WGFD simply doesn’t have all the answers to turn this important bighorn sheep population around. There is much to be learned about how to best address this decline and perhaps implement new or different management strategies and projects to attempt to arrest and reverse this trend. To do this, we must consider a different approach that includes all who are interested and passionate about this herd.

WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?
This approach will include a formal collaborative process and include people who care about and are knowledgeable about this herd. It will begin sometime later this summer and early fall with a “situation assessment” conducted by Jessica Western at the Ruckelshaus Institute that will include interviews with interested stakeholders which will help tailor the collaborative process. There will be three workshops, all held in Dubois, where we will WORK on specific subjects to share critical information, data, and ideas. We also held a Bighorn Sheep Summit in March to bring in “outside” experts from around the country to assist with charting a path forward.

WHEN DOES THIS HAPPEN?
The situation assessment was conducted and finished by the fall of 2018 (read this assessment below). The collaborative workshops began in February 2019 and conclude in early spring. The Summit was held March 14th. Upcoming are two more public meetings: April 3rd and June 5th. Please check our programs-events calendar for specific workshop dates.

WHAT ARE THE EXPECTED OUTCOMES?
Everyone involved will have a better understanding of the issues, challenges, and opportunities. Based on that understanding we will generate ideas and actionable items that can be addressed and/or implemented to hopefully improve conditions for this herd.

HOW DO I GET INVOLVED?
Everyone is “invited” and encouraged to participate in this process. WGFD and the National Bighorn Sheep Center will advertise the workshops and the summit online, on social media, local newspapers and radio stations. For more information on how to be involved or if you have questions, please contact Daryl Lutz at 307-335-2616.

Additionally, in late May 2019, NBSC has started to explore Citizen Science Data Collection as one way for the public to get involved and help with the observations of bighorn sheep in the Whiskey Basin area. The University of Wyoming has provided the basic data collection form in the bottom link below, and the public is encouraged to help provide observational data through this form to the University.

LINKS BELOW:

For a link to the full Situational Assessment, released on December 19, 2018, please click the first link below.

For a link to the full notes from the first February 2019 meeting, please click the second link below.

For links to the April 2019 workshop agenda, professionals input and issues summary from the February meeting see the third-fifth sets of links below.

For a link to the Citizen Science Observation Form, please see the sixth link below.

Read the DRAFT Whiskey Mountain Bighorn Sheep Plan in the final link below.

The draft plan as of May 28, 2019. Read it Here:

WMBHS_v052819_DRAFT

Special Events and Outreach

See the schedule of upcoming special events on the Events Page

LOCATION

10 Bighorn Lane, just off the main street in beautiful Dubois, Wyoming next to the Dubois Historical Museum. Look for our big bronze ram “Ram Country”.

SEASONAL HOURS

Autumn Hours
September 3, 2019 – December 21, 2019
Open 10am – 4pm, Monday – Saturday
Closed on Sundays

Winter Hours
December 22, 2019 – March 31, 2020
Open 10am – 4pm, Tuesday – Saturday
Closed on Sundays & Mondays

Spring Hours
April 1, 2020 – May 22, 2020
Open 10am – 4pm, Monday – Saturday
Closed on Sundays

Summer Hours
May 23, 2020 – September 7, 2020
Open 9am – 5pm, Open Every Day!

Special Closure Dates
Closed October 14: Indigenous People’s Day
Closed November 1 & 2: Bighorn Bash Annual Fundraiser
Closed November 11: Veterans Day
Closed November 28: Thanksgiving
Closed December 23-25: Christmas
Closed December 31 & January 1: New Year’s Eve & Day

photo: Jay Lunsford

photo: Bill Sincavage

ADMISSION

Adults age 18 and over: $6

Youth ages 8 – 17: $3

Children ages 7 and under: FREE

Adult Group (8 or more), Seniors (age 60 and over) and Military: $5

Youth Group (8 or more): $2

Current Members and VIPs: FREE

School Groups: Please contact us to set up your tour by calling 307-455-3429

Find out more about us and our work

The National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Association is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization which is dedicated to educating people about the bighorn sheep and the conservation of wildlife and wild lands. We accomplish this mission through exhibits which inspire our visitors, programs which educate youth and adults alike and special events, outreach and partnerships which help conserve bighorn sheep and other wildlife and wildlife habitat.


The Association operates the National Bighorn Sheep Center in beautiful Dubois, Wyoming. The National Bighorn Sheep Center features dioramas with full-scale taxidermy mounts that recreate bighorn habitat, interactive exhibits about wildlife management and special adaptations of wild sheep, and wildlife films the whole family will enjoy.

photo: Bill Sincavage